Photo Essay – Architect Buckminster Fuller.

by Amy Collier

Dymaxion Building
Photographer: Joel Yale / NYC, September 1959

Example of Buckminster Fuller’s work at the Museum of Modern Art.

Dymaxion Building
Photographer: Joel Yale / NYC, September 1959

Architect Buckminster Fuller explaining principles of dymaxion building.

Dymaxion Building
Photographer: Joel Yale / NYC,  September 1959

Architect Buckminster Fuller explaining principles of dymaxion building.

Dymaxion Globe
Photographer: Andreas Feininger / 1943

Dymaxion globe created by engineer and architect Buckminster Fuller.

Dymaxion House
Photographer: John Philips / 1941

Exterior of Buckminster Fuller’s “Dymaxion” house.

Dymaxion House
Photographer: John Philips / 1941

Interior view of Buckminster Fuller’s “Dymaxion” house.

Dymaxion House
Photographer: John Philips / 1941

Interior view of Buckminster Fuller’s “Dymaxion” house.

Dymaxion House
Photographer: John Philips / 1941

Interior view of Buckminster Fuller’s “Dymaxion” house.

Architect Buckminster Fuller
Photographer: John Loengard / 1970

Rowing Needle
Photographer: John Loengard / 1971

Inventor “Bucky” Fuller in his Rowing Needle.

Architect Buckminster Fuller
Photographer: John Loengard / 1970

Architect Buckminster Fuller
Photographer: John Loengard / 1970

[ Images via LIFE photo archives / ©LIFE ]
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Above is a varied collection of black and white photos related to visionary futurist architect, engineer and inventor Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (1895–1983). These images were taken by esteemed LIFE magazine photographers for feature articles spanning the early 1940s to the early 1970s.

Bucky Fuller is best known for his creative structure, the Dymaxion House:

Fuller’s solution to the need for a mass-produced, affordable, easily transportable and environmentally efficient house. The word “Dymaxion” was coined by combining parts of three of Bucky’s favorite words: DY (dynamic), MAX (maximum), and ION (tension). The house used tension suspension from a central column or mast, sold for the price of a Cadillac, and could be shipped worldwide in its own metal tube.

Read more >> “The Dymaxion Dwelling Machine”, Buckminster Fuller Institute

Additionally, check out Sandi’s earlier post on Mr. Fuller’s Dymaxion House which includes further information plus beautiful color models.

The “dymaxion” principle was not limited to housing, Mr. Fuller applied his engineering mind to also design cars, maps and bathrooms.

–Amy

[ Images via LIFE photo archives / ©LIFE ]

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